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Hurdles Remain to Signing Up More Latinos for Health Coverage

August 20, 2014

Hurdles Remain to Signing Up More Latinos for Health Coverage

By Fran Kritz

As a college-prep consultant, Marina Grijalva heard about the Affordable Care Act and how it would enable her to sign up for health insurance. But the enrollment campaigns — which the state poured tens of millions of dollars into — didn’t reach her sister or many other Latinos.

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Santa Barbara Joins Forces to Train Dementia Caregivers

August 18, 2014

Santa Barbara Joins Forces to Train Dementia Caregivers

By Matt Perry

Call it “disaster planning.”

With rates of dementia expected to reach epidemic proportions as an aging American populous lives longer, a Southern California city has formed an impressive coalition of business leaders, educators, foundations and long-term care settings to help train the next generation of caregivers.

Santa Barbara City College is launching two dementia training classes next year with a unique twist: class lectures will be followed immediately – in some cases the next day – with practical application at three local residential care facilities.

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Fields of Fear

August 15, 2014

Fields of Fear

By Lily Dayton

When Maricruz Ladino started a job at a Salinas lettuce packing plant in 2005, her supervisor began making sexual advances, insinuating that if she didn’t succumb to his sexual demands he would fire her. Then, one day the supervisor drove her to an isolated field—supposedly to inspect the crops. Instead, Ladino says, he raped her.

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Peer respites for mental health consumers prevent hospitalizations

August 12, 2014

Peer respites for mental health consumers prevent hospitalizations

By Lynn Graebner

As people with mental health crises overwhelm California’s hospitals, jails and homeless shelters, counties across the state are gradually embracing residential respite houses located in neighborhoods and staffed by peers — people who have been consumers of the mental health system.

For people on the verge of a crisis, staying at a peer-run respite, typically for a couple of days or up to two weeks, can help them recover with support from people who have had similar experiences.

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UCSF Team Works to Meet Physical Care Needs of Mental Health Patients

August 8, 2014

UCSF Team Works to Meet Physical Care Needs of Mental Health Patients

By Linda Childers

A cutting-edge program run through the UC San Francisco School of Nursing is helping people with mental illness better manage all of their health needs.

Sheila* is a single, homeless woman in her 40’s with a long history of bipolar affective disorder, complicated at times by substance abuse and periods of homelessness.

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Despite Regulations, Low-Income Californians With Learning Disabilities Often Fall Through the Cracks

August 6, 2014

Despite Regulations, Low-Income Californians With Learning Disabilities Often Fall Through the Cracks

By Claudia Boyd-Barrett

Shortly after she began participating in California’s Welfare-to-Work program, Michele Marino began to think she was going crazy.

The single mother had just enrolled in a government cash-assistance program to help support herself and her two young sons, while she searched for a job and took classes at a community college.

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Many Young Men Now Have Insurance, But Will They See a Doctor?

August 4, 2014

Many Young Men Now Have Insurance, But Will They See a Doctor?

By Amy DePaul

Twenty-one-year-old Albert is a self-described transient who picks up odd jobs whenever possible. On this day in mid-July, he’s waiting to be picked up for day labor in Santa Ana.

Albert has a black spot on his foot that he knows could signal diabetes, an illness that runs in his family and forced his uncle to lose a leg.

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Aging’s Staunch Ally in The City of Angels

August 4, 2014

Aging’s Staunch Ally in The City of Angels

By Matt Perry

Inside a bureaucratic jungle, Laura Trejo always finds room to roar. When Trejo sat in the midst of a panel of experts during the recent launch of a new state senate committee on aging, she spoke plainly yet firmly. During her 10-minute lecture, simmering tension escalated into barely controlled fury.

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A Nurse, a Friend and a Parenting Teacher: Home-Visit Program Helps Low-Income Mothers

July 25, 2014

A Nurse, a Friend and a Parenting Teacher: Home-Visit Program Helps Low-Income Mothers

By Lisa Renner

Oyuny Bahena was pregnant and living in a homeless shelter in Merced County when she first met with a home-visit nurse.

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Art With Elders: Stop Making Sense

July 20, 2014

Art With Elders:  Stop Making Sense

By Matt Perry

When expressionist painters like Pablo Picasso, Otto Dix and Barnett Newman waved their defiant brushes over blank canvases, they rebelled against the “logical minds” that had brought about one World War, then another. Art, they insisted, should free the mind from oppressive reality.

So it’s not surprising that in the shadow of the Beat Generation and Sixties counterculture, a Bay Area arts program has gained prominence in helping older adults circumvent constrictive thought to free the artist within.

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