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Despite Guidelines to the Contrary, Millions of Older Men Continue to Be Screened for Prostate Cancer

September 19, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Millions of older men continue to get the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test to screen for prostate cancer, contrary to new guidelines, according to research by investigators at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

The PSA test was approved by the Food and Drug Administration decades ago and widely recommended for many years.

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Daily Use of Marijuana by Kids and Young Adults Linked to Very Serious Outcomes, Including Suicide Attempts

September 12, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Kids and adolescents who use marijuana every day before they reach age 17 are more than 60 percent less likely to finish high school or get an equivalent degree than young people who have never used the drug, according to a new study.

The researchers, from universities in Australia and New Zealand, reviewed three long term studies on youth and teen drug use in those two countries and say the findings are applicable to drug use and outcomes in other countries, including the U.S.

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CDC Study Finds Too Few Kids Getting Preventive Care

September 11, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that millions of kids have not received some critical preventive services. These services include a hearing screening soon after birth, preventive dental care in order to avoid tooth decay and the HPV vaccine to protect against cervical cancer.

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Hog Farm Workers May Pose Community Bacteria Risk

September 9, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Half of all workers in industrial hog farms may carry potentially harmful bacteria in their nostrils, which can remain with the workers for up to four days after they are first exposed, days longer than researchers believed the workers harbored the microbes.

The bacteria detected by researchers, Staphylococcus aureus, was found to be largely antibiotic resistant, probably because of drugs used to treat sick hogs and to make them fatter for market quickly.

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Deciphering Electronic Lab Results a Challenge for Some Patients

September 4, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Researchers at the University of Michigan have found that some people, particularly those with poor number and health literacy skills, may not be able to understand the numbers on lab reports, or what steps may be needed as a result of the test results.

The study is important because since last February, the U.S.

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Obese Moms Who Limit Weight Gain During Pregnancy May See Improved Outcomes for Themselves and their Babies

September 1, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study has found that traditional weight loss techniques including food and exercise journals, weekly support meetings and nutrition and diet counselling are effective weight loss tools for pregnant women dealing with obesity.

The study, called the Healthy Moms study, also found that obese women who are able to hold down their weight gain during pregnancy are less likely to have large for gestational age babies, which can make a delivery more complicated and increase the risk of a child becoming obese later on.

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Treating Rumination in Young Adults May Prevent Episodes of Depression

August 29, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago finds that young adults with a past history of mental illness have “hyper-connected” emotional and cognitive networks in their brains.

Researchers say the networks may “talk to each other a little too much,” and result in rumination, a risk factor for depression.

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Poverty Status in Childhood Can Affect Impulsiveness and Decision Making Later in Life

August 27, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Growing up poor can influence a person’s sense of control and result in decision making that is impulsive, as well as tendencies to give up on certain tasks or decisions that require more measured thought, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota.

“We found that adults who grew up poor were more inclined to consider difficult and uncertain living conditions as beyond their control, while those from affluent backgrounds found them to be within their control.

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Birth Weight May Be a Culprit in Higher Rates of Diabetes Among African American Women

August 27, 2014

 By Heather Tirado Gilligan

African-American women may have higher rates of type two diabetes because they are more likely to have been born at a lower weight, according to a new study from researchers at Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center.

African Americans are more likely than whites to be born at a low birth weight, a condition that may result in infant death or may have a lifelong effect on health.

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Get Tested Hits the Streets During HIV Awareness Month

August 26, 2014

By Suzanne Potter

The sun-drenched Palm Springs area is a hotspot for the virus that causes AIDS. The prevalence of HIV in the Coachella Valley is twice the national average. Yet it is estimated that 50-70 percent of residents have never been tested for HIV and don’t know their status.

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