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Obese Moms Who Limit Weight Gain During Pregnancy May See Improved Outcomes for Themselves and their Babies

September 1, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study has found that traditional weight loss techniques including food and exercise journals, weekly support meetings and nutrition and diet counselling are effective weight loss tools for pregnant women dealing with obesity.

The study, called the Healthy Moms study, also found that obese women who are able to hold down their weight gain during pregnancy are less likely to have large for gestational age babies, which can make a delivery more complicated and increase the risk of a child becoming obese later on.

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Treating Rumination in Young Adults May Prevent Episodes of Depression

August 29, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago finds that young adults with a past history of mental illness have “hyper-connected” emotional and cognitive networks in their brains.

Researchers say the networks may “talk to each other a little too much,” and result in rumination, a risk factor for depression.

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Poverty Status in Childhood Can Affect Impulsiveness and Decision Making Later in Life

August 27, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Growing up poor can influence a person’s sense of control and result in decision making that is impulsive, as well as tendencies to give up on certain tasks or decisions that require more measured thought, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota.

“We found that adults who grew up poor were more inclined to consider difficult and uncertain living conditions as beyond their control, while those from affluent backgrounds found them to be within their control.

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Birth Weight May Be a Culprit in Higher Rates of Diabetes Among African American Women

August 27, 2014

 By Heather Tirado Gilligan

African-American women may have higher rates of type two diabetes because they are more likely to have been born at a lower weight, according to a new study from researchers at Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center.

African Americans are more likely than whites to be born at a low birth weight, a condition that may result in infant death or may have a lifelong effect on health.

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Get Tested Hits the Streets During HIV Awareness Month

August 26, 2014

By Suzanne Potter

The sun-drenched Palm Springs area is a hotspot for the virus that causes AIDS. The prevalence of HIV in the Coachella Valley is twice the national average. Yet it is estimated that 50-70 percent of residents have never been tested for HIV and don’t know their status.

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Medi-Cal Complaint Office Hasn’t Produced Quarterly Report in Nearly a Year, Despite Huge Increase in Cases

August 26, 2014

By Hannah Guzik

Despite having a huge increase in cases, the state office that handles complaints about health plans for low-income people hasn’t produced a quarterly report in nearly a year.

The quarterly reports help officials identify large-scale problems affecting people enrolled in the health program, called Medi-Cal.

The Managed Care Ombudsman Office typically produces a report every three months that shows the number and type of cases it’s handled for each managed-care plan in California.

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Native Americans Ancestry May Pose Significant Eye Disease Risk for Latinos with Diabetes

August 25, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study by researchers with the University of Southern California (USC) Eye Institute has found that Latinos with Native American ancestry who have type 2 diabetes have a significant risk of diabetic retinopathy – the leading cause of blindness in U.S. adults. Diabetic retinopathy affects more than more than 4 million Americans age 40 and older.

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Food Allergies May be More Common Among Inner-City Kids

August 22, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Inner-city kids, who are already known to have higher rates of asthma and certain allergies, may also be more likely than kids in the general population to have at least some food allergies, according to a recent study.

The study researchers reviewed data on 516 inner-city children from birth through age 5 in Boston, Baltimore, St.

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New Study Finds Malnutrition Common Among Older ER Patients

August 21, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that many older adults who were seen in the emergency room for health problems also showed signs of malnutrition or the risk of malnutrition, though most had not previously been diagnosed with the condition.

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Poll: More Californians back ACA

August 20, 2014

After years of steady but stable support for the federal health reform known as the Affordable Care Act, California voters strengthened their embrace of the new law after it was implemented this year, according to a poll released this week by the Field Research Corp.

The survey of 1,535 California voters showed support for the law growing to 56 percent to 35 percent.

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