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New Study looks at Health and Well-Being of Latino Children in California

October 22, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study shows significant differences between the health and wellbeing of the 4.7 million Latino children in California and white children in the state. The study, conducted at the request of the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health,* also shows Latino children now make up almost half the children in the state.

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Spike in ER usage from newly insured declines over time, study says

October 15, 2014

Pent-up demand for health care leads to a spike in emergency room visits and hospitalizations among the newly insured, but those numbers quickly decline as people’s needs are met and their health becomes more stable, according to a new study from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

The study could mean that fears of an explosion in public costs due to the expansion of the Medicaid program, known as Medi-Cal in California, will prove unfounded.

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Most Parents Install Car Seats for Newborns Incorrectly

October 14, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study finds that nearly all parents install car seats for newborns incorrectly. Parents who are low income or speak poor English are the most likely to make installation and positioning mistakes.

Researchers from the Oregon Health and Science University Hospital selected a certified child passenger safety technician to observe close to 300 parents of newborns or their designees install car seats.

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Medicaid recipients see benefit boost

October 14, 2014

From Kaiser Health News

With an improving fiscal climate, many states are increasing benefits for Medicaid recipients and paying their providers more.

The trend is continuing into fiscal year 2015 for those who rely on Medicaid, the state and federal health insurance program for the poor, according to a survey of 50 state Medicaid programs released Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the National Association of Medicaid Directors.

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Living Near a Highway May Increase High Blood Pressure Risk for Older Adults

October 10, 2014

By Fran Kritz

A new study by researchers at Brown University finds that living near a highway may increase the risk for high blood pressure.

The researchers reviewed data from the Women’s Health Initiative, a long term study funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, on 5,400 post-menopausal women in San Diego.

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Low-Income Patients Get Care More Quickly, Less Expensively at Federally Qualified Clinics

October 2, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Patients who are uninsured or receiving Medicaid benefits were able to see doctors faster and for less money at Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) than in private primary care practices, according to a new study by researchers at the University Of Pennsylvania.

The researchers analyzed data from a previously published “secret shopper” study of calls in ten states (Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Texas) published in 2012 and 2013.

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Could Some in the U.S. Undergo Colonoscopies Too Often?

October 1, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Many people still don’t follow published guidelines that recommend colonoscopies for most people ages 50 to 74 every ten years. But some in that age range are having the test too often, finds a new study by researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

The researchers reviewed electronic health data on close to 1,500 patients ages 50 to 65 who had a first colonoscopy between 2001 and 2010 and found that a second colonoscopy was done on 871 patients an average six years after the first one, or four years too soon.

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Study: Prenatal Exposure to Some Chemicals May Increase Risk of Asthma in Children

September 29, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University recently published a study that found a strong link between prenatal exposure to two phthalates, chemicals used in many household products, and development of childhood asthma. Environmental Health Perspectives

The study found that kids born to mothers exposed during pregnancy to high levels of two phthalates, butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) had a 72 percent and 78 percent increase in risk of developing asthma between age 5 and 11, compared to kids born to mothers who were exposed to lower levels of the chemicals.

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Healthy Lifestyle Factors May Prevent Most Heart Attacks in Men

September 23, 2014

By Fran Kritz

Four out of five heart attacks in men may be prevented by adopting a healthy lifestyle, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Healthy lifestyle behaviors include moderate alcohol use, not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight and diet and getting regular exercise, say the Swedish researchers who conducted the study.

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Conference on 9/23 to focus on health reform

September 22, 2014

Capitol Weekly and the University of California, UC Center present Health Care: California, a conference examining the California health care landscape, one year into the Affordable Care Act. This event will be filmed for later broadcast by the California Channel.HealthCare2014

The day-long conference will be held in Sacramento on September 23, 2014.

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